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Wine MBA Program: Industry Communications, Sonoma State University, Seminar Syllabus,

WINE INDUSTRY COMMUNICATIONS

Sonoma State University Wine MBA Seminar

January 6, 2012
Presented by Lewis Perdue
lperdue@ideaworx.com

http://wineindustryinsight.com

WEB LINK FOR THIS DOCUMENT: http://wineindustryinsight.com/?p=38854

WEB LINK FOR PAUL MABRAY’S VINTANK  SOCIAL MEDIA PRESENTATION: http://www.box.com/s/44ersp1gkjfzaz80ca09

ABSTRACT

This three-hour session in wine industry communications will cover basic principles along with detailed discussion of effective and ethical methods for public and media relations as well as marketing and corporate communications.

The majority of the seminar’s information will be delivered via oral lecture supplemented by real-time examination of online media. There will be no handouts, so attendees are urged to take clear notes.

Depending upon the experience, interest, and expertise of the seminar participants, Perdue will cover subjects not listed in this syllabus or will cover subjects out of order.

The links below are presented for future reference and should be considered as supplemental materials. With the exception to original articles written by Lewis Perdue, the linked materials do not necessarily reflect Perdue’s personal opinion nor does he endorse any of articles, all of which are the property and expressions of the individual authors and/or publications.

PURPOSE

Whether legacy, online or social media, all business communication must have a purpose, or it wastes time and money. Before engaging in any form of communication, you must answer the following questions:

  1. “What do I wish to accomplish?”
  2. “What expectations do I have?”
  3. “How do I measure success?”

Your goals may be branding, market share, immediate response or others, but if you can’t answer each of those in five words or less, then you will fail. It’s not sufficient to say, “Because we have news,” or “Because our competitors are doing it.”

THE FOUNDATION

Even if you have clear goals, you will fail unless your message is ALL of the below:

  1. Targeted
  2. Timely
  3. Substantial
  4. Clear
  5. Accurate
  6. Credible
  7. Legal
  8. Ethical

TARGETS, TOOLS, TIMELINESS, REACH

  1. Instant (minutes, hours) – Twitter, Facebook, email (push medium)
  2. Near-term (hours to days) – web site, television, radio, daily newspapers, ebook (long or short), Scribd
  3. Mid-term (weeks, months, years) – newspapers, monthly magazines, books

MEDIA PERSISTENCE

Archiving can affect total life, but the effective life is the length of time your message can affect your target audience behavior.

  • Twitter: Effective life – seconds to minutes.
  • Facebook: Effective life – minutes to hours.
  • YouTube: Effective life – minutes to hours
  • Radio: Effective life – minutes to hours.
  • Television: Effective life – minutes to hours unless transitions to YouTube.
  • Website: Effective life – hours to weeks depending on refresh rate.
  • Email: Effective life – minutes, but may persist for years depending upon user’s archive habits.
  • Daily Newspapers: Effective life – minutes to a day.
  • Weekly magazines: Effective life – minutes to a week.
  • Monthly Magazines: Effective life – minutes to a month.
  • eBooks (including sites like Scribd): Effective life – hours to years.
  • Print Books: Effective life – hours to years.

PUSH MEDIA

  • Email is old school (1971), but still has the ability to drive traffic to newer technology. Opt-in and easy un-subscription are vital.
  • Web pop-ups, pop-unders, twitching banners, scintillating Flash and and auto-running videos are not push, they’re just pushy. Some are bandwidth thieves and a source of software crashes.

VIRALITY – THE EXCEPTION TO PERSISTENCE

Content must evoke high-arousal emotions (positive has a slight edge on negative): awe, happiness, laughter anger, anxiety (but not sadness). Surprising, useful or interesting.

Contentment is low arousal. Anger (bad service) is high arousal. Anxiety works too: See BMW commercial reference, p. 35 of Wharton (below)

MANAGING MULTIPLE SOCIAL MEDIA: ONE POST, MANY MEDIA

WORKING WITH JOURNALISTS (ARE BLOGGERS JOURNALISTS?)

PAY FOR PLAY=SLEAZY

PAY FOR PLAY= SLEAZY (PARKERGATE EDITION)

“BRANDED JOURNALISM” IS NOT JOURNALISM

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

ETHICS, OTHER

EFFECTIVE PR AND MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

CRISIS COMMUNICATIONS

SOCIAL MEDIA

Social media prefers to know who you are,what you are doing, and what makes you interesting and worth spending time with rather than what you’re selling. This is not a prohibition against selling. But should be a caution to lead people to sales rather than push them. For example, a new product or service can be a suitable topic for social media. But, instead of a hard sell, focus on fun, features, details of development, manufacture, the people behind it etc.

Sell? Certainly. That’s why you are in business. But in social media, you must deliver your message socially.

ONLINE ADVERTISING

  • Banner blindness
  • Frequent changes
  • Text ads
  • Context-sensitive
  • Offer usable, actionable information, not just a logo or hard sales pitch.
  • Issue a call to action
  • “Free” still works.
  • Testimonials from customers or clients lend hefty credibility.
  • Facts work better than hype
  • Avoid annoying people

FREE ONLINE TOOL TO IMPROVE WRITING

Bad writing is a waste of your time. If you don’t write clearly, then you might as well not write at all. Fuzzy writing reflects fuzzy thinking. It wastes your time and annoys those struggling to read it. And shorter is better. It equals higher information concentration.

You doom your every idea, no matter how wonderful and world-changing, when you shroud it in unclear writing.

or a more off-the-wall version:

WINE-ORIENTED BOOKS BY LEWIS PERDUE


A NOTE ABOUT YOUR SEMINAR LEADER AND THE STRUCTURE OF THE SESSION

The seminar structure will be altered according to the needs of the participants. Lewis Perdue has served on the faculties at Cornell University and the University of California, Los Angeles and learned early on that every class is different and that impromptu modifications need to be made in order to provide the best learning experience.

Perdue will survey the class at the beginning to determine this need.

Perdue is willing to examine communications topics through the lenses of his experience: He is a New York Times best-selling author who has written twenty-one books. Sixteen of those books are thrillers and the remaining five cover wine, technology, and how porn has driven the technology and business model of the World Wide Web.

He has founded four companies including a wine import/distributorship, two technology firms, and the highly respected Wine Business Monthly and associated ventures (which were sold in 1997).

Perdue has been been a top aide to a U.S. Senator and a state governor, run political races for Congress, worked as a Washington (D.C) correspondent (Ottaway/Dow-Jones, States News Service), a columnist for Gannett, The Wall Street Journal Online, CBS Marketwatch and TheStreet.Com.

He has served in a wide variety of corporate and entrepreneurial roles including marketing, marketing communications, Chief Technology Officer, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman. He has taken one technology company public.

Perdue studied physics, biology and communications and received his B.S. (1972) with distinction from Cornell University.

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